Tag: videos

Noise Filtering Power Distribution Board by Synthrotek

Noise Filtering Power Distribution Board - DIY Kit

Instagram Photo - SR Noise Filtering Power Distribution Board Kit

At the core of all our modular racks is power. As with any eurorack module, the most common type of connector is the ribbon cable either with a 10-pin connector or a 16-pin connector. What those connectors plug into is either a busboard on a PCB or a flying bus cable. We will be taking on the Synthrotek Noise Filtering Power Distribution Board for our first June build.

We have a large custom Eurorack case that we need to fill with modules and we needed noise filtering distribution boards to ensure we have the best power/noise filtering available… Synthrotek answered the call!

We opted for this board because it has power on all three rails (-12, +12, +5) and contains an LED for each rail so that we know the power is flowing like it should. The cool thing about this distro board is that it also has its own ground connection on each rail. It can be used in conjunction with the Synthrotek Power Supply System or it can be used with various other power supplies.

On to the build, time lapse and galleries…


Synthrotek TURN Eurorack Module DIY Build

Synthrotek TURN - Power Management Module DIY Build

Synthrotek TURN - Instagram photoAre you having power issues with your Eurorack system?  Do you ever experience flashing lights of doom when you power on your system? The Synthrotek TURN might have you covered!

Let’s face it … rack systems draw and use a lot of power. Whether this be on start up or whether it be through a sustained time period (during recording, tinkering, performing, etc). Much like the Windows screen of death or the Mac spinning rainbow wheel; rapid blinking lights or no lights upon startup of a rack system can be VERY stressful. This is something that we can all face from time to time and trying to find the source of the issue can be a real task. Things like flipped power cables, bad solder joints and overloaded power rails can all be culprits. With all of these potential issues causing power draws, the gang out at Synthrotek have come up with a solution to tackle power management upon startup. Introducing the Synthrotek TURN.


4MS Atoner Eurorack Module DIY Build

4MS Atoner Eurorack Module - DIY Build

For our latest eurorack build, we take on the mystical Atoner by 4MS Company. This little beast is only available as a kit that can either be ordered from 4MS directly or through other DIY module shops. We picked up ours from the gang out at SynthCube and dove right into the build.

As for the build itself, it was relatively straight forward thanks to the extensive BOM and assembly guide that were provided with the 4MS Atoner kit. Where the build can wonder into the intermediate build category is with the tight ground wiring and navigation of confined spaces (see photos). With that being said, make sure your iron is clean and primed correctly as you don’t want to go into this build with a dirty iron or a dull tip. As for aesthetics, we loved the graphic design on the panel but didn’t care for the knobs that were supplied with the kit. They looked like generic cheap knock off Davies clones, so we chose our own orange Davies Clones to give our 4MS Atoner a little more flavor.


Laurentide Synthworks VG2 Eurorack Module Kit

Laurentide Synthworks VG2 Eurorack Module - DIY Build

Laurentide Synthworks VG2

Laurentide Synthworks VG2 is a Passive Dual Vactrol Gate meaning no power is needed to get some awesome sounds out of this eurorack module!  Each Vactrol Gate on the VG2 has 1 CV Input (gate, envelope, LFO, etc.), 1 Audio Input and 1 Audio Output. The CV Input hits the Vactrol LED, allowing whatever audio to pass through. In addition, there is a simple Low Pass Filter applied to the Audio Output with an amount (i.e. Cutoff) knob. As this is a passive circuit, it will not give you full cutoff control, but it does allow the calming of brash wave shapes. There is also an LED at the CV Input for a quick visual reference of the incoming signal.

Keep in mind that a passive circuit using a vactrol can cause subtile differences in tone and output sound. One may be slightly “louder” than the other, or one might have a longer or shorter release time. One circuit could be better suited for drums or percussion while the other might process harmonies or sequences more to your liking. That being said, each vactrol or VG2 is unique in its sound.  Being that the Laurentide Synthworks VG2 is available as a DIY kit only, this gives the builder the opportunity to tweak some of the resistors and vactrols and thus making each individual build unique in itself.


Scroll Up