Tag: Reverse

Reverse Landfill Monotropa V3 – DIY Build

Reverse Landfill Monotropa v3 - DIY Build

When it comes to unique and must have modules for our rack, Reverse Landfill is one of the top manufacturers on our list. This month, we are following up our Aconitum Noise Mixer build with another Reverse Landfill aptly called the Monotropa.

This diy module one of the Monotropa’s currently being offered by Martijn. The other version of the Monotropa is known as the Monotropa II or mk2 and is also available via the Reverse Landfill ETSY shop.

Reverse Landfill Logo
Monotropa - Completed Front

At its core the Reverse Landfill Monotropa is a feedback EQ distortion module or basically a bad ass mother f*cker. It consists of 4 pots for frequency volume, 1 pot for feedback amount and 1 pot for gain amount. Since this kit is the 3rd version of the original Monotropa, several revisions to the layout and panel have also been updated. These are subtle differences but they make one hell of an impact.

To sum up this module, it can make any sound bigger, add bass, mids and highs with resonant qualities. In other words, it can completely destroy your beats and percussion which is EXACTLY what we were looking for. Would this module be love at first patch? Let’s see… 

Links and more links…

Below are a series of links that have been provided by Reverse Landfill to help assist with the use, building and patching of the Monotropa v3.

If you are building an older version of the Monotropa, you will have use this link to see all of the versions previous to and including the v3 (this build).


Reverse Landfill Aconitum Noise Mixer – DIY Build

Reverse Landfill Aconitum Noise Mixer - DIY Build

We are HUGE fans of Reverse Landfill and their modules and we were lucky enough to pick up the Aconitum CV mixer module prior to it being discontinued. This noise mixer module has 3 types of analog noise which include white and 2 colored typed with adjustable bass and treble knobs.

The noise outputs are also normalized to the volume knobs and if nothing is patched in, these outputs control the noise volume. At only 8HP, the Reverse Landfill Aconitum Noise Mixer was our first build of 2021. 

Reverse Landfill Logo
Completed Aconitum

As with any Reverse Landfill module, Martijn (the owner) provides excellent documentation via his website. You can download the Aconitum V2 Build files here or on the main Reverse Landfill website. After you download the build files, it is important to read the BOM carefully. There are no fancy graphics showing components so you will want to make sure you know how to read a BOM.

If you don’t know how to read a BOM, you might want to go ahead and turn away. Martijn’s modules are for the intermediate to advanced builders and novices will want to take a backseat on these until they have a little more experience. Now, enough with all of the intro stuff… you know how we do this… on with the build!!

Resistors and Capacitors...

First up are the resistors. The resistors are all individually labeled so it is easy to see what is what. If you are unsure, either use a component tester or a multimeter to test the values of the resistors. There are 22 resistors total and placing them is quick and easy. We used top down soldering on the resistors to help speed up the process of tacking things down……


Reverse Landfill Pentamix – DIY Build

Reverse Landfill Pentamix - DIY Build

Reverse Landfill’s unique approach to modular synthesis is something that they are becoming known for. Their cryptic silkscreens on their panels also makes for some interesting patching if one is unfamiliar with the modules. The Pentamix is one of Martijn’s newer modules that helps bring all of the other Reverse Landfill modules together.

A 5-channel audio mixer, the Pentamix’s real magic happens when you patch the inverted output and use the another output to send out to an effect and then back again into the Pentamix.

With its 555 pentagram, this mixer brings a new dimension to ones rack… but enough about the module, let’s get onto the build… 

Resistors and Diodes...

Start with the resistors on this build. There are not very many of them (12 to be exact) and their polarity doesn’t matter. Each resistor set is marked so its easy to figure out what goes where if you can read a BOM.  You can find all of the Pentamix’s documentation on the Reverse Landfill website for quick reference. 

Diodes are next and one thing we love about Martijn’s modules is the extra power protection. The diodes (x2) will protect your module if the power is reversed for any reason. The 2x resistors next to the diodes are there for extra protection. One thing to know about diodes is that their polarity does matter. You want to be sure that the black line on the diode lines up with the silkscreen on the PCB. A quick tack down of these and its time to move onto the IC sockets and caps. 


Reverse Landfill Creep Cluster – DIY Build

Reverse Landfill Creep Cluster - DIY Build

Completed Creep Cluster Front Panel

As we dive into the fall season and Halloween draws near, we decided to take on a little module known as Creep Cluster by Reverse Landfill . Until recently, little was known about the Creep Cluster as it was only available as a desktop synth. We were very intrigued by the desktop model and were stoked to see Martijn decide to release the eurorack version. 

Upon picking up the module through Reverse Landfill’s ETSY page (listed here), we made sure to read through the assembly guide and double checked the BOM to ensure that we had everything ready once the module arrived from overseas. Thankfully, we had a few single female single header wires/pins (at least 3 are needed) but we did have to order some extra wire for the build. A quick order on Amazon and we were ready to go in a couple days. 

What about the design?

The wooden panel with the Reverse Landfill logo really give the panel a unique look. This is something that Reverse Landfill is known for up until recently, as they now offer black panels as an option. 

As for the PCB panels, they are royal blue with a white silkscreen. Martijn also had a little fun with the PCB as you can see by placing an “Easter egg” on the board.  Now, lets get on with the build!

You Creep!

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