Tag: modular synth

Setonix Synth Marsupial – DIY Build

Setonix Synth Marsupial - DIY Build

Following up our last build of the Setonix Synth Boing!, we decided it was time for another back to back build of their Setonix Synth’s newest module, Marsupial. What is it you ask? 

The Marsupial is a dual VCF module that is based around the re-issued AS3350 filter IC. Due to its normalization between the control inputs and the parallel switch, the Setonix Synth Marsupial is a unique filter that can surprise any artist when patching it up. With that being said, let’s jump into the build.

Let's Get This Build Going..

Starting off with the build of this module, we will work on the backside of the PCB first. You will want to solder the 2×5-pin power header, 3-pin Series selection header, and two 25k multi-turn trimmers.

Be careful not to hold the iron on the parts for that long as you can release or damage some of the pre-soldered SMD components.

Don’t forget to place the plastic shunt over two of the three pins of the 3-pin header–”BP” will normalize Filter A’s Bandpass output to the Series switch, while “LP” will normalize Filter A’s Lowpass output to the same.


Setonix Synth Boing! – DIY Build

Setonix Synth Boing! - DIY Build

As many modular manufacturers come and go, we often are intrigued by the not so well known ones. Setonix Synth is one of these, and we have to say that they are coming onto the scene with a HUGE BOING! Located in upstate New York and started in 2021, Setonix Synth derives its name from a little cute marsupial from Western Australia. (thats pretty rad). 

We happened to be surfing ETSY one evening and came across the Setonix Synth Boing! by chance. It was a partial DIY kit and it was very reasonable priced. We ordered it up and waited for it to arrive. Upon its arrival, we knew it would be a fast build due to the SMD components being all tacked down. 

Setonix Synth Boing! - What is it?

The Setonix Synth Boing! is a discrete transistor based low pass gate with some grit. It is a light dependent circuit that uses vactrols and a JFET transistor input and output stages. The Boing also uses an active LED control circuit, thus allowing for negative feedback and some gnarly overdrive…. basically, its a kick ass 4hp module that everyone needs in their rack. 


Evaton Technologies AModulator – DIY Build

Evaton Technologies AModulator - DIY Build

The Evaton Technologies AModulator SDIY kit is a companion module to the RF Nomad voltage-controlled shortwave receiver. What does that mean though?

In crude form the AModulator is a RF amplitude modulator that produces a micro-power radio-frequency signal which the RF Nomad can decode. 

Still not making sense? It’s ok, it didn’t make sense to us until we dove a little more into this sidecar module. 

Simply put, the AModulator allows you to encode any audio signal into an amplitude modulated RF signal, which the RF Nomad can then decode back to audio, with all the artifacts of vintage shortwave sound.

The AModulator SDIY kit consists of two printed circuit boards and thru hole components required to complete the kit. One circuit board contains the actual electronics of the module, and the other circuit board serves as both the faceplate of the module, as well as a touch-plate antenna. 


Neutral Labs NERMAL – DIY Build

Neutral Labs NERMAL - DIY Build

In the world of modular synthesis, there are many companies that offer distortion modules, but few of them really stand out. The Neutral Labs NERMAL is a destructive 3 layer distortion module that is able to modulate frequencies in the audio range to produce some rather unexpected harmonics. 

Known primarily for the desktop synth ELMYRA, the NERMAL is Neutral Labs first stab at eurorack and from what we can tell, it won’t be their last. We were anxious to get our hands on this build and learn all about its unique abilities. 

The Kit and where to get it (in the U.S.)

After seeing a few demos of the NERMAL, we knew we had to track one down. We ordered up from our friends over at Synthcube and within a few days it arrived safe and sound. Upon cracking the box open we were shocked to see the care in separating the components into “sections” or smaller packaging.

Neutral Labs really made it easy to keep the parts from getting all mixed up. They even state on their build document that one needs to go through one bag of parts at a time so that you won’t lose parts or have to double check resistor values. This was pretty rad that they were thinking of the builder.