Tag: gate

Synthrotek Roboto – DIY Build

Synthrotek ROBOTO - Eurorack Modular Build

Synthrotek Roboto DIY Kit
Roboto Eurorack DIY Kit by Synthrotek

As 2019 came winding down, the gang out at Synthrotek sent us over the Roboto Eurorack DIY kit and low and behold, we were onto another build. The Synthrotek Roboto was originally released in 2017, but has quickly become a staple in a lot of musicians racks due to its versatility and uniqueness. 

From the first module in our rack, we have always had our eyes on the Synthrotek Roboto. We were excited to finally take this one and see what it could do. Roboto is known as a vocoder, pitch shifter, speak-n-spell effect processor, vibrato provider, an 8-bit modulator or plain and simple…  a bit crusher.

Now, let’s get on with the build.


Synthrotek Arcadian Rhythms – DIY Build

Synthrotek Arcadian Rhythms - DIY Modular Build

Completed Module

As the new year draws upon us, we take on a brand new module originally introduced at Knobcon 2019. The Synthrotek Arcadian Rhythms is a touch controller that brings the feel of the retro arcade right to eurorack. 

The design of the module is quite simple. Three arcade buttons, a power header, some standoffs, three jacks, a few resistors and a couple trimmers make up the module. This simple, yet intricate little design gives even the novice builder a chance to take a stab at DIY.

Synthrotek have always had a knack for ensuring that the builder is well suited to tackle their builds. They not only include a BOM with their kits, but they post their BOM and assembly instructions on their website as well.

Now, enough with all that… let’s get on with the build.


Error Instruments TOMO (Ketchup) – DIY Build

Error Instruments TOMO Eurorack Module - DIY Build

When it comes to unique modules in the Eurorack world, a few names come to mind. One being Error Instruments located in the Netherlands. The owner, Paul Tas is like a mad scientist when it comes to his creations and the new Error Instruments TOMO is no exception.

The TOMO is a new 12HP touch interface CV/gate controller for eurorack synthesizers. Originally released as a stand alone module, the “Ketchup” version of TOMO finds its way into DIYers hearts. We picked one up immediately after hearing of its release. 

So whats with the TOMO names?​

Ketchup, Toxic, Blanks, TOMO … these are all different names for the versions or panel colors of TOMOs. The Ketchup is the only DIY version and basically matches the color of our favorite dipping sauce. This is the kit we assembled for this review and build video. TOMO Toxic is a yellowish green color and TOMO blanks is a white version of the glitchy touch controller. 

The original TOMO panel comes in a black and is still readily available if you are interested. They are all available over at Pauls ETSY shop.

Enough with all the filler, let’s get onto the build!


Reverse Landfill Creep Cluster – DIY Build

Reverse Landfill Creep Cluster - DIY Build

Completed Creep Cluster Front Panel

As we dive into the fall season and Halloween draws near, we decided to take on a little module known as Creep Cluster by Reverse Landfill . Until recently, little was known about the Creep Cluster as it was only available as a desktop synth. We were very intrigued by the desktop model and were stoked to see Martijn decide to release the eurorack version. 

Upon picking up the module through Reverse Landfill’s ETSY page (listed here), we made sure to read through the assembly guide and double checked the BOM to ensure that we had everything ready once the module arrived from overseas. Thankfully, we had a few single female single header wires/pins (at least 3 are needed) but we did have to order some extra wire for the build. A quick order on Amazon and we were ready to go in a couple days. 

What about the design?

The wooden panel with the Reverse Landfill logo really give the panel a unique look. This is something that Reverse Landfill is known for up until recently, as they now offer black panels as an option. 

As for the PCB panels, they are royal blue with a white silkscreen. Martijn also had a little fun with the PCB as you can see by placing an “Easter egg” on the board.  Now, lets get on with the build!

You Creep!

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