Tag: filter

Setonix Synth Marsupial – DIY Build

Setonix Synth Marsupial - DIY Build

Following up our last build of the Setonix Synth Boing!, we decided it was time for another back to back build of their Setonix Synth’s newest module, Marsupial. What is it you ask? 

The Marsupial is a dual VCF module that is based around the re-issued AS3350 filter IC. Due to its normalization between the control inputs and the parallel switch, the Setonix Synth Marsupial is a unique filter that can surprise any artist when patching it up. With that being said, let’s jump into the build.

Let's Get This Build Going..

Starting off with the build of this module, we will work on the backside of the PCB first. You will want to solder the 2×5-pin power header, 3-pin Series selection header, and two 25k multi-turn trimmers.

Be careful not to hold the iron on the parts for that long as you can release or damage some of the pre-soldered SMD components.

Don’t forget to place the plastic shunt over two of the three pins of the 3-pin header–”BP” will normalize Filter A’s Bandpass output to the Series switch, while “LP” will normalize Filter A’s Lowpass output to the same.


Neutral Labs NERMAL – DIY Build

Neutral Labs NERMAL - DIY Build

In the world of modular synthesis, there are many companies that offer distortion modules, but few of them really stand out. The Neutral Labs NERMAL is a destructive 3 layer distortion module that is able to modulate frequencies in the audio range to produce some rather unexpected harmonics. 

Known primarily for the desktop synth ELMYRA, the NERMAL is Neutral Labs first stab at eurorack and from what we can tell, it won’t be their last. We were anxious to get our hands on this build and learn all about its unique abilities. 

The Kit and where to get it (in the U.S.)

After seeing a few demos of the NERMAL, we knew we had to track one down. We ordered up from our friends over at Synthcube and within a few days it arrived safe and sound. Upon cracking the box open we were shocked to see the care in separating the components into “sections” or smaller packaging.

Neutral Labs really made it easy to keep the parts from getting all mixed up. They even state on their build document that one needs to go through one bag of parts at a time so that you won’t lose parts or have to double check resistor values. This was pretty rad that they were thinking of the builder.


Waveform Magazine PT2399 Delay – DIY Build

Waveform Magazine Project 1 - PT2399 Delay Module - DIY Build

When it was announced that there would be a magazine dedicated to modular synthesis, you can imagine the feedback from the modular community. Waveform Magazine was born in the summer of 2019 and upon its release it created a following.

To much of everyones surprise, not only was this a magazine that reviewed modules, manufacturers, artists, etc.. it also contained its very own DIY projects.

Project #1 was a upcycled karaoke reverb PCB that would be transformed into a eurorack delay. Otherwise known as the PT2399 Delay or Waveform Magazine Project #1, this little 5HP module inspired a whole new group of DIYers due to its new found glory of being published.

Waveform Magazine PT2399 Delay Module

PT23.. what?

At the heart of Waveform Magazine Project #1 is the PT2399 chip. The PT2399 is a CMOS echo/delay processor developed by Princeton Technology Corp.

This digital chip includes an ADC (Analog to Digital converter), 44Kb of RAM to store the samples and a DAC (Digital to Analog converter). This chip was created as a simple solution to add delay/reverb/echo to karaokes and set-up entertainment systems. Pretty rad eh?

The PT2399 is readily available and has a minimum delay of 30ms and a maximum of 340ms (that could be extended up to 1 second at the expense of sound quality) which makes it perfect for delay, echo and reverb effects.

Waveform logo yellow

Sound Study KONTACT Mic – DIY Build

Sound Study KONTACT Mic - DIY Build

Stylized KONTACT Mic

For this build, we take on the Sound Study Kontact Mic Eurorack module. This 4HP module is a unique way to interact with your system on multiple levels. It’s creative applications are endless: finger percussion/rubbing/scratching, guitar input (works surprisingly well with just a little lo-fi crunch), acoustic sources to CV, etc.

While this module has been out awhile now, we wanted to pick up another mic source to add to our racks. The modules rad skull design along with its small footprint made it the perfect candidate!

Study what? Sound?

Sound Study Modular only produces a few modules or stand alone utilities. Along with the Kontact Mic, they are responsible for the MIDI 2 CV (stand alone or eurorack format) which we also use in our racks. Their PCBs and panels are solid and are black with silver accents.

As the MIDI 2 CV is a clone of the famous CVPAL, the Sound Study Kontact Mic is a clone of the MTM Mikrophonie. With that being said, we have both of Sound Study’s modules and we wouldn’t leave home without them!

Enough of the descriptions, let’s get onto the build