Tag: chaos

Zlob Modular Triple Cap Chaos – DIY Build

Zlob Modular Triple Cap Chaos - DIY Build

Started in 2015, ZLOB (pronounced ZWOB) Modular offers a unique take on modular synthesis. Their latest module, the Triple Cap Chaos is unlike anything that came before it as stated on the ZLOB website. We found this intriguing and once it was announced via their social media feed, we jumped on the kit and ordered one up. Shipping was fast and before you knew it, it was ready in waiting in our backlog. 

Triple Cap Chaos (C^3 Chaos) is a 2hp analog, chaos based, noise oscillator, pseudo ring modulator/harmonics generator, and audio mangler. Sounds friggin’ rad huh? We thought so too.  According to the ZLOB website, “It expects a +5v to -5v max signal in to modulate the chaos. The “IN” jack is an A.C. coupled input for audio in, although cv and audio can work for both the “CV” in jack and “IN.” The “IN” will interfere and interact with the onboard chaotic oscillator depending on the frequency of the input, which may take some experimentation”.. This module … is right up our alley.  Let’s get on with the build shall we?

Triple Chaos - kit
Zlob Modular - Triple Cap Chaos Kit

About the kit ...

ZLOB provides some really great documentation via their website which is always a plus when taking on a new build. The components were also individually labeled which shows how much time the company puts into their product. This also made it easy to sort things out when cracking the kit open. We used our handy dandy acrylic sorting tray to separate out all the parts prior to jumping into the build. 

fin Divider

Sacramento Audio Waffle 64 at the Red Museum

Audio Waffle 64 Flyer

Whats under that rainbow? Golden WAFFLES of course! Come and check out the Sacramento Audio Waffle 64 at the Red Museum Sunday, March 15, 2020. There will be some amazing coffee, OJ and Waffles (including whipped cream) provided.  


Synthrotek DIRT – DIY Build

Synthrotek DIRT Eurorack Module - DIY Build

Completed DIRT Module
Completed DIRT Module

A classic Synthrotek filter, the DIRT is a 4HP module that is a necessity in any modular system. We actually have two of these and forgot to do a build video for the first… so guess what we did? You got it, a time lapse build of our second little module with grit.

What is the Synthrotek DIRT? It is described as a low-pass filter or effect module for eurorack modular systems. It has three knobs all which coinside with different variables of tone/sound. It can be used for filtering, ring mod effects, wave shaping and even harmonic distortion (which you can hear in our audio samples below).

Let’s get on with the build shall we?

How hard was the build?

The Synthrotek DIRT is a pretty simple build actually. It took about an hour to complete with a few stops along the way to change the tunes and grab some knobs for customization. 

One thing you want to make sure to pay attention to is the polarity of the caps (as usual) and the values of the potentiometers. There are only three pots, but all three have different values. The nice thing is that Synthrotek provides a great assembly guide and packed BOM for your reference. When referring to the assembly instructions, you will find that there are actually three different versions of the Synthrotek DIRT. A 9V standalone version (for pedals) and 2 eurorack versions are available. (At the time of this review, PCB version 2.2 is the current version). 


Bizmuth Chaotic Signal Router – DIY Build

Bizmuth Chaotic Signal Router - DIY Build

Close up Panel - Bizmuth Chaotic Signal Router
Bizmuth Chaotic Signal Router

As we approach the new year, the Bizmuth Chaotic Signal Router kit for Eurorack landed on our workbench. The Bizmuth is purely what it states it is – a signal router for modular systems. What does this mean? 

According to Bizmuth Modular, you can route switch or combine up to six signals, or generate up to six gates by turning three endless knobs with one hand.

The module has three identical switches with three IO Jacks each: A, B and C. All operate according to the same four step connection sequence: A B C, A-B C, A-B-C, A B-C, and so on. A dash (-) indicates a connection between the signals.

As you turn a knob, the connection sequence of the corresponding switch advances and new connections appear between the three IO jacks. The connection sequence repeats 24 times in one full 360 revolution. That means you have a different patch every 3.75 degrees.

All jacks are also bi-directional, which means you can use them as inputs and outputs. Read that again… you can use them as inputs and outputs. For example, you can route a signal from the B IO jack to A, A and C, or just C, just like you can route two signals from A and/or C to B.


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