Category: Media

Synthrotek Roboto – DIY Build

Synthrotek ROBOTO - Eurorack Modular Build

Synthrotek Roboto DIY Kit
Roboto Eurorack DIY Kit by Synthrotek

As 2019 came winding down, the gang out at Synthrotek sent us over the Roboto Eurorack DIY kit and low and behold, we were onto another build. The Synthrotek Roboto was originally released in 2017, but has quickly become a staple in a lot of musicians racks due to its versatility and uniqueness. 

From the first module in our rack, we have always had our eyes on the Synthrotek Roboto. We were excited to finally take this one and see what it could do. Roboto is known as a vocoder, pitch shifter, speak-n-spell effect processor, vibrato provider, an 8-bit modulator or plain and simple…  a bit crusher.

Now, let’s get on with the build.


Bizmuth Chaotic Signal Router – DIY Build

Bizmuth Chaotic Signal Router - DIY Build

Close up Panel - Bizmuth Chaotic Signal Router
Bizmuth Chaotic Signal Router

As we approach the new year, the Bizmuth Chaotic Signal Router kit for Eurorack landed on our workbench. The Bizmuth is purely what it states it is – a signal router for modular systems. What does this mean? 

According to Bizmuth Modular, you can route switch or combine up to six signals, or generate up to six gates by turning three endless knobs with one hand.

The module has three identical switches with three IO Jacks each: A, B and C. All operate according to the same four step connection sequence: A B C, A-B C, A-B-C, A B-C, and so on. A dash (-) indicates a connection between the signals.

As you turn a knob, the connection sequence of the corresponding switch advances and new connections appear between the three IO jacks. The connection sequence repeats 24 times in one full 360 revolution. That means you have a different patch every 3.75 degrees.

All jacks are also bi-directional, which means you can use them as inputs and outputs. Read that again… you can use them as inputs and outputs. For example, you can route a signal from the B IO jack to A, A and C, or just C, just like you can route two signals from A and/or C to B.


Error Instruments TOMO (Ketchup) – DIY Build

Error Instruments TOMO Eurorack Module - DIY Build

When it comes to unique modules in the Eurorack world, a few names come to mind. One being Error Instruments located in the Netherlands. The owner, Paul Tas is like a mad scientist when it comes to his creations and the new Error Instruments TOMO is no exception.

The TOMO is a new 12HP touch interface CV/gate controller for eurorack synthesizers. Originally released as a stand alone module, the “Ketchup” version of TOMO finds its way into DIYers hearts. We picked one up immediately after hearing of its release. 

So whats with the TOMO names?​

Ketchup, Toxic, Blanks, TOMO … these are all different names for the versions or panel colors of TOMOs. The Ketchup is the only DIY version and basically matches the color of our favorite dipping sauce. This is the kit we assembled for this review and build video. TOMO Toxic is a yellowish green color and TOMO blanks is a white version of the glitchy touch controller. 

The original TOMO panel comes in a black and is still readily available if you are interested. They are all available over at Pauls ETSY shop.

Enough with all the filler, let’s get onto the build!


DivKid Mutes – DIY Build

DivKid Mutes by Befaco - Eurorack Modular Build

DivKid Logo

Have you ever wanted to just insert a quick break or turn off a certain portion of your composition and yet keep the track rolling?  If so, you need to pick up a DivKid Mutes by Befaco for your Eurorack system.

Comprised of four I/O channels and four accommodating 3-way switches, the Mutes goes beyond basic muting. For our final build of September, we take on the DivKid Mutes, and get to learn a little more about what this little 4HP module is capable of. 

A Brief History of Mutes

Anyone who dabbles in the modular world is well aware of a company called Befaco.  They are known for producing top quality modules like the KICKALL, Rampage and Chopping Kinky (just to name a few). Their modules have become a staple to any rack over the past few years. 

Additionally, there is a gentleman by the name of Ben who lives in England and goes by the name DivKid.  He is always in the modular know and is constantly previewing and reviewing new modules over on his YouTube page/webpage. His videos are hands down some of the reasons we pick up some of the modules that we have in our cases. Long story short, these two amazing teams partnered up to create the Mutes. 


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